Meniere's Disease

( Endolymphatic Hydrops ) Meniere's Disease is a disorder characterized by dizziness and/or vertigo, hearing loss, ringing in the ear, and/or a feeling of fullness in the ear.

Etiology for Meniere's Disease

This shows a cross-section of the cochlea with the vestibular membrane, the membrane that separates endolymph and perilymph, bulging from excess endolymph.

The term endolymphatic hydrops refers to a state of excessive fluid within the endolymphatic space. Endolymphatic hydrops can be caused by a number of diseases that can affect the rest of the body. These include metabolic disorders such as diabetes, low or over-active thyroid functioning, and high cholesterol or triglyceride levels. There are a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders that can also cause these symptoms. The term "Meniere’s syndrome" refers to the constellation of symptoms including fluctuating hearing levels, sensation of fullness in the ears, roaring tinnitus, and episodic vertigo. Technically, the term "Meniere’s disease" refers to endolymphatic hydrops for which no other cause can be found.