Facial Paralysis from Facial Nerve Tumors

A facial paralysis that begins insidiously and progresses in severity is characteristic of a tumor arising from the facial nerve or, more commonly, a tumor that arises from adjacent structures and secondarily invades the facial nerve.

Treatment for Facial Paralysis from Facial Nerve Tumors

Treatment of parotid gland tumors includes surgical excision of the parotid gland along with the involved facial nerve. A nerve graft is obtained either from the neck, arm, or leg to replace the involved facial nerve. Occasionally, it is necessary to follow the facial nerve into the middle ear in order to be sure the entire tumor is removed. Oftentimes, radiation therapy is also given after surgery.

The facial nerve decompression is seen through bone.

The facial nerve has been decompressed by widening the area that the facial nerve passes through.

Treatment of schwannomas depends on the symptoms at presentation.  If the facial nerve function appears normal or near normal, it may be wise to either follow these tumors with clinical exams and imaging studies or recommend surgical decompression. If there is rapid growth or if the facial function declines with time, surgery to remove the tumor with reconstruction of the nerve may be indicated.